December 25, 2004

Today

Was watching this movie made by Richard Attenborough. Was deeply moved by the incidents in the movie coupled with the soothing music on the background. During the course of the movie the protagonist says that poverty is the worst form of violence. Read somewhere that around 233 million Indians are living below the poverty line. Also was glancing through these articles as to how China is fighting poverty.

Was reading through a short review of another movie : Seeds of Burden

8 comments:

Ramesh said...

Poverty is surely a challenge. I think the main reason of poverty in India is due to the collapse of the agrarian model economy, triggered by the British. It is infact I believe the Mughals nad British created the poverty in India, eventhough the credit goes mainly to the latter, the former too played their part.

I read in www.goodnewsindia.com that China's achievement on poverty reduced is not as great as it is hailed, since in China the poverty line is 76 USD per year per person, whereas in India it is around 350 USD, which is the WHO standard.

Kannappan said...

Good info from u. But there is no point in blaming the British or the Mughals other than being careful to see to it that no such kind of invasions happen in the future. Past is past.

Around 233 million people are hungry. But I doubt if we have seen even a few of them (Because we have been very insensitive to such issues). So its very difficult to understand if there really is poverty. And if so are the people suffering from poverty are themselves to blame.

I was reading a cover story of leading Indian business companies like Tata, Reliance, ITC are all taking to the villages because they feel that there is a great market potential in the villages. As long as these companies dont exploit the villagers, all that is going to come out of such intiatives is only good and great for the future. Have u heard of e-choupals in villages initiated by ITC. I've just heard of them. Got to read something about that.

We being in the field of computers can try doing something related to our field for the betterment.

phoe6 said...

I have a copy of that movie and it is one my favourite. There are lot of lessons to be learnt from it.

Mahatma is weak and is dying and not giving up on his resolve as not to take any food until the civil war ends. A mob comes and puts down its arms in front of his bed. One guy cries,"Are you happy now?"."you know I had such a small child and those mulsalmans killed him".
Gandhi looks at him and suggests."May I give you a solution?
Adopt a small child as your child was.Make sure that he is a mulsalman and bring him up only as a mulsalman and then see..."

This one moved me.

Ramesh said...

I don't understand Gandhi there mate. "Adopt a child and bring him up as Musalman...." ???? Did he meant, it all depends on your raising the kid than belonging to a particular religion? If that is what he meant, then I am afraid he looks as a relgious fanatic, since a religion is usually formed around the customs, practices and beliefs of a society. It is the environment in which a man grows. Did he intended to say Musalmanic society is unable to produce kids who are kind?

Kannappan said...

Ramesh I guess you got the point completely wrong. Maybe watching that scene will help.

Infact that scene was very good. In my view Gandhi just wants to convey the hot-tempered hindu guy the message "Try understanding the Muslim culture by bringing up the small boy as a muslim".

Yeah till that point I was watching but that scene really makes you sit up and take note. The message behind that scene was good and so characteristic of Gandhi that we sometimes take such things for granted. However I felt both Attenborough and Ben Kingsley failed there because the scene looked so artificial and acted out in a heroic sort of way.

Another inspiring scene was the one where Gandhi just goes to the sea and keeps staring at it for sometime pondering on what to do. All on a sudden he says to a foreign friend nearby Am going. The friend asks repeatedly Where are you going?. He says Am going to walk. But where?. Am going to walk the Dandi March and (*Not the exact words...just the essence*) collect salt from the sea.

Am not sure of the truth but as per the movie Dandi March idea was taken in a spur of a moment. It just flashed across his mind when he was staring at the sea.

Yeah there was another significant event though not comforting. Shall write it out as our conversation progresses.

phoe6 said...

Yeah,Kannaps explained it.
Ramesh, you somehow got it wrong and you should see it to feel it.
>>Did he meant, it all depends on your raising the kid >>than belonging to a particular religion?

Your Mulsaman Son will love you as much you your Hindu Son would have and you will feel the same love for him as he grows up, no matter what religion it is.


>If that is what he meant, then I am afraid he looks as >a relgious fanatic, since a religion is usually formed >around the customs, practices and beliefs of a >society.



I dont know how religion is formed.But for a hindu couple to adopt a mulsalman child and bringing him up as a mulsalman is all practical advice.


>>Did he intended to say Musalmanic society is unable >>to produce kids who are kind?

No Way.

Good movie yaar and you know one more thing I realized recently.
I am a fan of "Freedom and Midnight" but it potrays Gandhi and Lord Mountbatten as heros and Jinnah as somewhat villian. Found that its not all that true.

Jinnah decisions were influenced by the congress party motives as well. Seems that he too was a good leader.

Ramesh said...

Mates,

I knew Gandhi would never have meant what I said in that post. There are many ways to vent your feelings you see ;)

regards,
Ramesh

Ramesh said...

>> I am a fan of "Freedom and Midnight" but it potrays Gandhi and Lord Mountbatten as heros and Jinnah as somewhat villian. Found that its not all that true.

I read the book only 2 years back and I was annoyed by the spin of Edwina and Mountbatten as the saviours of the Indians during the time of crisis. Recently I read a interview of Lapierre and, as much as the interviewer, I suspected whether he is a philanthropist who likes to play god.

>> Jinnah decisions were influenced by the congress party motives as well. Seems that he too was a good leader

I haven't read much about Jinnah's decision making but the means he took to achieve a separate nation of Pakistan does not fit the image he wanted to create for himself. I refer to the Direct Action Day of the Muslim League.

But, the real curse was on India. If I have to pardon Nehru I would send Jinnah to heaven.